Monday, January 5, 2015

Pinterest - Some of the Ways I'm Using It

I have had Pinterest for a while now, but my use has been on and off. I think for me it is not something I need on a daily basis, but certainly a great tool for when I find an eLearning resource I want to easily curate. So, here as some eLearning resources I have collected in my Pinterest boards thus far. 

eLearning - Anything eLearning related, often a lot of useful infographics are pinned. 

ISD - All things ISD, again plenty of infographics. 

Creative eLearning Examples - Inspiring examples from many great eLearning designers, and creative people from other fields too. 

My eLearning Portfolio - Some screen shots from my own portfolio. 

Any suggestions or do you have boards you would like to share? Please feel free to add them to the comments section below. 

Sunday, November 16, 2014

And the last element of #IMPS... Streamline

Streamline the content, language and course interface.

Here is where prioritizing the must, good and nice to knows pays off. 
  • That "must" content is front and center - your emphasis.
  • The “good” is still accessible but may not be up front - a bit deeper into sections, appear in interactive assets, pop-ups, etc.
  • The "Nice to knows" - We are not using up real estate on these. These are:
    • Things that people who really want to learn more - curiosity or using the info at a higher level than the target audience. 
    • Things we told the SME we would fit it in when we were compromising. 
    • Great for pop-ups, an additional resources page, links to other sites, supporting materials, social media, informal learning resources or in additional interactive elements,etc.
  • Navigation - The course does not need to be linear - especially if audience has diverse learning needs, for example they may not need all the content. This will allow them to pick and chose what may be relevant to their learning needs and not make the course unnecessarily long for them.
  • Games - Lot of content, but not thrown at you all at once and a game can simultaneously put it in context - can be more "show" not "tell."
  • Cartoons - Simple scenario showing concept that brings it home instead of in-depth explanation of the concept.
  • Use analogies - Quicker and easier to understand if has similarities to the familiar - Remember, the audience brings knowledge to the table, tap into it.
  • Job Aids – Sometimes a job aid can be a better route, especially if it is something learners have to remember specific steps and apply on a less than regular basis (e.g., a task in software application). These are also good for a "Nice to Know" task that may not apply to all – Open it if you need it. Infographics may also suffice if the content is more informative than step-by-step.
  • Grammar & Style – Don’t make them read “War & Peace!” Trim the prose down as much as possible (i.e., eliminate passive sentences, successive propositional phrases, wordiness, etc.). 
Here is a quick IMPS guide for you. A link is also available under "Jeff's Links" on the right. 

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Prioritize - #IMPS

The third element of IMPS is Prioritize. 
IMPS Logo
Prioritize your content into  must know,” “good to know” and “nice to know” levels.

  • Must know - Look back at your objectives - What MUST they learn to reach those objectives. That's your top level/emphasis - As newspaper journalists would say "above the fold."
  • Good to know - Those things not imperative, but still of value in accomplishing the task to be learned. Maybe not emphasized but still accessible in the course. 
  • Nice to know - They can still do the job without this info, but it has value in understanding the subject in greater depth. It can often add more context around the topic or be information that will be of value as the learners progress and grow - ongoing learning. These will be topics that may be accessible in the course, but not distracting attention away from higher priority content. 
In the next post, Streamline, I will discuss how we use the above prioritization in the course design.

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Managing Stakeholders, SMEs and Design Team - #IMPS

The second element of IMPS is Manage.

Manage* stakeholder, subject matter expert and design team’s expectations - Get them “on-board” with designing concise, but effective courses.

Here's how:

  • Get buy-in on what is needed to accomplish the course's goal. Emphasize it is "OUR course," belonging to all stakeholders especially the learner. We want a course that is:
    • Efficient use of learners’ time, as well as the organization’s time.
    • Convenient – There needs to be as little interference and time away from their jobs as possible.
    • Instructionally sound - Teach what learners’ need in order to apply the KSA's (not more, not less).
  • Address everyone’s role:
    • They must know your role and your team’s role, as designers. So often problems occur because they believe they will determine the objectives and design the course. They also don’t know what ISD is and what you do.
    • Discuss their roles and expectations (e.g., SMEs as a resource for you to learn subject and get clarification. They are not expected to design and write content - you will design and write it as instruction that will work online - that is your expertise).
    • If they provide materials and content, use what supports the learning objectives and rewrite as needed. Let them know you will shape it to work online. They may be possessive of it so assure them you won’t change meaning – just make it concise and deliver in instructionally sound manner.
    • You will have persistent SMEs that won't give up on throwing in the kitchen sink. There's always a compromise that won’t do extreme harm to the integrity of the course – we’ll talk about that in the next phase, Prioritize.
*The Identify and Manage phases will overlap, especially in regards to introducing the roles of the SME and eLearning Designer during initial meetings and needs analysis.

Sunday, September 14, 2014

My Twist Conversation with the eLearning Guild - #DevLearn

David Kelly of the eLearning Guild interviewed me recently regarding my upcoming presentation at the DevLearn conference, "Be Concise: Designing for On-the-go Learners."



The eLearning Guild's Twist blog also has additional interviews and posts from other DevLearn presenters - all worth the visit. 

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

#IMPS - Identify Objectives

In my recent Being Concise - IMPS post, I introduced my approach to keeping courses concise. In today's post I want to explore the first component - Identify, as in identifying learning objectives.
"Identify appropriate learning objectives and exclude the extraneous objectives trying to sneak into the course."
Here's how:
Conduct a needs analysis (even if it must informal)
  • Stay focused on what learners need to succeed?
  • Ask questions like “How will you/they be using this” and plenty of “Why” questions - The right questions will help identify what KSAs are REALLY needed.
  • Yes, you will meet with SMEs, but also connect with and observe those actually applying the skills.
  • Don’t just take the SMEs word for it – They tend to want to teach EVERYTHING (not what is specifically needed). 
  • Learn and use the KSAs you will be teaching, as much as possible. You will see even more learning needs when you are knee deep in the subject. 
Once you have the information needed to identify your learning objectives:
  • Write up a course design plan (CDP) – Minimally outline the learning objectives.
  • Use the CDP for review and agreement with your stakeholders and SMEs (not approval – agreement).
  • Some edits may be needed, but the CDP should be a solid framework for all involved – limiting surprises and unneeded content when course drafts are presented.
Check in again for the next IMPS post and learn how to manage your stakeholders and SMEs.

Sunday, August 3, 2014

I'm Speaking at #DevLearn

DevLearn Conference - Be Concise Session 101

I'm excited to be presenting again at the DevLearn conference this fall. Below is the description of my presentation

Be Concise: Designing for On-the-go Learners
eLearning designers often face complex training topics that are difficult to deliver concisely. This results in lengthy courses that are counter to the needs of today’s learners who need to be extremely efficient with their time. To deliver effective learning to this audience means being very concise in both content and course design, while still having impact and not sacrificing instructional integrity.In this session you will learn a strategy for keeping learning concise while remaining impactful, engaging, and retaining your audience. You will explore four measures to employ in the instructional design process. First, identify appropriate learning objectives and exclude the extraneous objectives trying to sneak into the course. Second, manage the stakeholder, subject matter expert, and design team’s expectations. Third, prioritize content into levels of “must know,” “good to know,” and “nice to know.” Lastly, streamline the content, language, and course interface. You will leave this session with a practical strategy for creating concise courses while not sacrificing learning.
In this session, you will learn:
  • A design process that ensures concise, but effective, eLearning
  • How to get subject-matter experts and your team on board with creating concise courses
  • How to efficiently prioritize and manage learning content
  • How to streamline the content, language, and course interface
  • How to use learning assets to succinctly deliver content (e.g., interactions, games, visuals, analogies, infographics, etc.)
DevLearn is an incredibly informative, and fun, conference. I highly recommend it for any involved in eLearning - it is worth your time whether a beginner in the field or an expert. 

Hope to see you there.